Culture

Culture

Burt’s Bees Co-Founder Lives In A Tiny House

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Have you ever wondered who the “Burt” behind the famous natural products company Burt’s Bees was? Perhaps you have, but you probably don’t know much about the reclusive man, and for the most part that’s the way he likes it.

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Burt’s Bees co-founder Burt Shavitz may have missed the big payout for the company, but he did get a pretty nice tiny house out of it. He’s still living in it and doesn’t seem inclined to leave – even for a little while.

“A good day is when no one shows up. And you don’t have to go anywhere,” says the famously reclusive beekeeper.”

If you’d like to spend a little time with him anyway, there’s a new documentary about his life, Burt’s Buzz, available for rent on Amazon; you can also watch the trailer there or check it out below.

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Watch the video below to learn more about his life

Eccentric Rolling Home Is A Work Of Art

Well, this answers the question, “What would it look like if you built a house on top of Mater from Cars?” The man who gave us that answer is John, a self-described “nomad artist” who calls the customized 1949 Dodge truck home as he travels the country painting, making handcrafted jewelry, and applying tattoos.

He built it, and he’s still building it, both to incorporate mementos of his journey and to replace pieces that have finally worn out. The latter’s a fairly frequent necessity because he used 100% salvaged materials in the truck.

In fact, John says that “It will probably look completely different in a year.” At which point we suppose he’ll have to start calling it the Truck of Theseus.

Joe’s Tiny Truck 3Joe’s Tiny Truck 1Joe’s Tiny Truck 2

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A Rolling DIY Motorhome Michelangelo Would Envy

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Some artists spend years, decades even, working on their “piece de resistance” if you will. The finished product might be a statue, a painting, or in the case of John Driscoll, a most unique gypsy wagon. He calls it the “Big Maroon” and it all began in 1971 when he paid $125 for a 1959 Federal truck that was originally a flatbed farm truck. Ever since then he’s been working on it, converting it into the one of a kind masterpiece you see here.

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No detail went overlooked in the construction of this custom home on wheels, from the exterior to the interior and everything in between. He had plenty of help along the way, and the exterior shell was finished in 1975. It clocks in at 11′ tall, 25′ long, and weighs 1,500 lbs. including water, fuel, a boat, motorcycle, groceries, and one dog.

bigmaroon_07You need a serious engine to power a home like this, especially with the added weight of the build. At one point he swapped the Pontiac 2-barrel 389 for a 455 cubic inch Edelbrock with aluminum heads, custom intake, and a 650 carburetor. There’s certainly no shortage of power now, and along with the engine he also customized the power steering, transmission, brakes, and rear axle to ensure all that power gets put to good use.

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The most impressive features don’t live under the hood however, but rather in the custom living space he built on the flatbed. A true craftsman, John created a vintage living space that’s efficient and stylish, incorporating beautiful vintage lighting and custom cabinetry into the finish. He even made the stained glass on his own.

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photos courtesy Timeattackmanila

John has racked up more than 40k miles traveling around the US and Canada for more than 40 years and during that time he’s gradually maintained and enhanced the build. His is a story of perseverance and determination, of completely realizing one’s dream not to mention pure American DIY craftsmanship on a level few of us will ever achieve. Yet we can admire his effort and draw inspiration for our own projects.

10 Things Only Someone From Michigan Understands

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11. “UP” doesn’t refer to a famous Dis...

Source: Wikimedia Commons use Magnus Manske

22. You can experience all four seasons in 24 hours.

Source: Giphy.com

Rain in the morning, snow in the afternoon, and maybe a burst of sunshine in the evening. Nothing unusual about that.

44. Feeling ill? Have a Vernor’s Ale.

Source: Flickr user Ron

It’s no secret that ginger ale helps you feel better, but there’s really only one choice when it comes to the brand that works best.

55. UM/University of Michigan is the only rivalry in spo...

Source: Wikimedia Commons Michael Barera

Choose your side wisely and pray you don’t have two children that go to each school.

66. It’s perfectly normal to get Canadian coins as...

Source: Flickr user Shawn Carpenter

Given the proximity to our friendly neighbors to the north, you shouldn’t be surprised if half your change ends up being Canadian. Don’t worry though, it works just the same as ours.

77. That craving for venison meat

Hunting deer is a big thing up here, and pretty soon you’ll develop a taste for it.

88. It’s pronounced “Mackinaw”

There’s really only one true way to say it, “mac-in-awe”, but you can bet any outsider will screw it up.

99. Western Michigan might as well be a second Netherlan...

Source: Christian Reformed Church in North America Facebook

The Dutch have a strong presence in this area, so don’t be surprised if you can’t remember whether your neighbors are the “Vanderwidens” or the “Vandercamps” or some other similar variation.

1010. The Michigan left

Every state has it’s own driving nuances, and it’s no different here, where the “Michigan Left” is just part of the routine.

What do you think best defines your state? Let us know in the comments and we will add it to the list!

This Guy Trained Bees To Make Marijuana Infused Honey!

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39-year old Frenchman Nicolas is a locksmith, beekeeper, artisan, and crusader for medical cannabis and legislation in France. “Nicolas Trainerbee,” as he has been nicknamed, grew up treating his hyperactivity disorder with cannabis, and has spent the past 20 years of his life studying animal biology, entomology, and the practice of growing cannabis. He has had a life-long passion for nature and animals (specifically insects), which has led to his life-work of researching how to combine the properties of the cannabis plant and the insects that he has dedicated his life to. The result: “Cannahoney.”

Nicolas Trainerbees at work among his honeycombs.
Nicolas Trainerbees at work among his beehives.

Trainerbees decided to combine the health benefits of bee products with the benefits of cannabis, as he claims that “everything that passes through the body of a bee is improved”. He gives the example of propolis, a natural antibiotic, antifungal product of the resin of willow and poplar trees collected by bees. “Cannahoney” is the term coined by Trainerbees to describe his unique, one-of-a-kind cannabis honey. After extensive observation, he has trained his bees to collect the resin of the cannabis plant and use it in the beehive to produce the final product.

Trainerbees' bees hard at work in the production of cannahoney.
Trainerbees’ bees hard at work in the production of cannahoney.

Trainerbees describes the cannahoney as having a floral aroma, with the color of the product ranging from light green to white or yellow. Due to the legal barriers existing in France, he must tend to his 30 beehives and various strains of cannabis in open air spaces far from his home. He is still in the process of conducting detailed analysis of the product to determine all of the properties of cannahoney, yet reports that he has had three individuals that suffered from anxiety disorders agree to test the product and report to him that after ingesting cannahoney, they felt “a lot better.”

The final product, cannahoney.
The final product, cannahoney.

Nicolas Trainerbees’ main goal at the moment is to leave France for Spain. In Spain, he will be able to legally treat his hyperactivity disorder and also have the freedom to work with other professionals in the field to conduct the proper and thorough research that cannahoney requires. With all sorts of advancements happening in the legal marijuana industry, from hi-tech portable vaporizers like the Arizer Extreme Q to automated grow room technology, it seems clear that he has found his own slice of the niche. It is unclear when cannahoney would be available to the public at large, but surely his followers on social media – 4,300 Facebook and 700 Instagram followers – wish him Godspeed on the project!