Eccentric Rolling Home Is A Work Of Art

Well, this answers the question, “What would it look like if you built a house on top of Mater from Cars?” The man who gave us that answer is John, a self-described “nomad artist” who calls the customized 1949 Dodge truck home as he travels the country painting, making handcrafted jewelry, and applying tattoos.

He built it, and he’s still building it, both to incorporate mementos of his journey and to replace pieces that have finally worn out. The latter’s a fairly frequent necessity because he used 100% salvaged materials in the truck.

In fact, John says that “It will probably look completely different in a year.” At which point we suppose he’ll have to start calling it the Truck of Theseus.

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He Saw A Homeless Woman Sleeping In The Dirt. What He Did Will Change Her Life!

How many times have you passed a homeless person without thinking much about their situation? Chances are we all have at some point. Homelessness is a pervasive issue that doesn’t seem to have any easy solution, but one man made a perfect demonstration of how to make a difference.

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Smokie is a 60-year-old homeless woman who lives in Los Angeles, and spends most of her time on a patch of dirt near an apartment building. Elvis Summers lives in that apartment building, and the two became aquainted as Smokie would often ask him for bottles and cans that she could recycle.

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Then one day Elvis heard about Greg Kloehn, a kind spirit in Oakland who made a name for himself building small shelters for homeless out of scraps he found in the garbage. He used pallets, bed boards, washing machine doors, and whatever else he could find to build the little homes, barely larger than a dog house.

Elvis was inspired by Greg, and decided he would make a home for Smokie, which you see here. The LAPD has been good-natured about things, saying as long as she moved it every few days nobody could complain.

It took five days and about $500 for Elvis to build the home, and he documented the process in a video he shared on Youtube:

“I’d like to offer purpose to these people in need and hire them to build the houses with me. I’ve even set an appointment with LA’s Mayor Eric Garcetti to try and get his help,”

The story is a great example of how one person can make a difference in the world, and also a practical demonstration of how tiny homes can help solve a very real problem in the world. After he finished, Elvis decided to launch a project called Mythpla (my tiny house project LA) to fund more shelters, and plans to continue building tiny homes for people who need them.

You can visit this Gofundme page to contribute to the effort.

City Bus Turned Offgrid Motorhome For The Nomadic Adventure Seeker

Every craftsman brings their own vision to a new project, with different ideas of what “finished” really means. Projects like this often remain in a state of flux, constantly evolving, but in the case of this offgrid motorhome, we think the owner has crossed the finish line in style.

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The La Chancita bus began its life as a 1966 Mercedes-Benz bus that spent its time as a city bus in Buenos Aires. Since then, Manu Fombeurre has overseen a dramatic transformation of the bus, turning it into a rolling home with room to sleep five, a fully equipped kitchen, shower, toilet, and wood burning stove.

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The entire interior was gutted and transformed into a sleek wood-paneled beauty with all the creature comforts you’d want in a motorhome.

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The transformation took place over nine months, and the finished Chanchita now serves as a base for adventure lovers looking to travel in style to remote wilderness locations. Faction Skis serves as the primary sponsor for the bus, and they contract rentals to interested parties – whether looking to hit a remote surfing destination in the summer or take an epic ski trip in the winter, the Chanchita channels the spirit of adventure that Argentina is known for. We can imagine they have a pretty good life, which might be made all that much better with something like this portable hot tub hammock for camping.

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Want to learn more about the Chanchita, or schedule your own tour? Check out their website.

A Rolling DIY Motorhome Michelangelo Would Envy

Some artists spend years, decades even, working on their “piece de resistance” if you will. The finished product might be a statue, a painting, or in the case of John Driscoll, a most unique gypsy wagon. He calls it the “Big Maroon” and it all began in 1971 when he paid $125 for a 1959 Federal truck that was originally a flatbed farm truck. Ever since then he’s been working on it, converting it into the one of a kind masterpiece you see here.

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No detail went overlooked in the construction of this custom home on wheels, from the exterior to the interior and everything in between. He had plenty of help along the way, and the exterior shell was finished in 1975. It clocks in at 11′ tall, 25′ long, and weighs 1,500 lbs. including water, fuel, a boat, motorcycle, groceries, and one dog.

bigmaroon_07You need a serious engine to power a home like this, especially with the added weight of the build. At one point he swapped the Pontiac 2-barrel 389 for a 455 cubic inch Edelbrock with aluminum heads, custom intake, and a 650 carburetor. There’s certainly no shortage of power now, and along with the engine he also customized the power steering, transmission, brakes, and rear axle to ensure all that power gets put to good use.

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The most impressive features don’t live under the hood however, but rather in the custom living space he built on the flatbed. A true craftsman, John created a vintage living space that’s efficient and stylish, incorporating beautiful vintage lighting and custom cabinetry into the finish. He even made the stained glass on his own.

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photos courtesy Timeattackmanila

John has racked up more than 40k miles traveling around the US and Canada for more than 40 years and during that time he’s gradually maintained and enhanced the build. His is a story of perseverance and determination, of completely realizing one’s dream not to mention pure American DIY craftsmanship on a level few of us will ever achieve. Yet we can admire his effort and draw inspiration for our own projects.

DIY Steampunk Camper Joins Fantasy And Function

In case you ever wondered what happens when steampunk style collides with travel campers, we have the answer. You end up with something like this:

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For the uninitiated out there, “steampunk” refers to a sub-genre of science fiction in the fashion/lifestyle world where technology and 19th century steam engine style come together. In this instance we see what happens when it meets the world of travel campers, and the result is quite stunning.

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Dave Moult is the man behind this fantastic wood and copper clad camper. In 2008 he had the idea to travel Scotland and live out of a camper, the only thing was, he didn’t yet own one. So he decided to build his own, which spawned a new passion.

He never went on that trip, but he did end up building six different campers, including the one you see here. It includes a chandelier made from a coffee pot and copper pipe, a library, folding copper sink and cooking space in the trunk.

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Interested in building your own teardrop trailer? Dave recommends checking out the many resources available online, including the Facebook group page The Teardrop Club of Great Britain and the forum tnttt.com