Abandoning Luxury Life in Dubai For Offgrid Living In The Desert. And Never Looking Back.

One recent migrant to Sunseed had a great high paying job in Dubai, one of the world’s most opulent centers of luxury, where you’re born a captain of industry. Money doesn’t mean anything because everybody has so much of it there, it’s just a way of life.

Traffic on a street at night, long exposure.

What is Sunseed you say?



Tucked in the lower Andalusia area of Spain, Sunseed is a place where people shun technology, where they find escape from the nagging need to check Facebook and Instagram every two minutes, among many other things. Those who come here have a certain broader outlook, opting to live within limits, off the grid, using sustainable resources to live comfortably. A nomadic sort of life.


While the area might be bleak, a sort of desolate desert you’d find in a Clint Eastwood western, a harsh climate that gets exceedingly hot in the day while temperatures at night plummet to bone-chilling lows.


However, the advantages of tolerating these extremes of living go far, and bring some extreme results.

The average person in Sunseed makes just 3kg to the 478kg of the average American citizen.

Living here brings new opportunity to explore therapeutic treatments that might stray from conventional medicine. They eat better, healthier.


And there’s a sort of self-governenace where the members meet each week to discuss things, make communal choices, and keep things healthy between others who share in the community.


When the closest town you can walk to is a 90-minute trip, you learn a bit more about self-sufficiency. You adopt a permaculture, worry-free

4_eco-village 3_eco-village

Sources: Inhabitat |

When This School Brought Meditation Into The Classroom, Some Rolled Their Eyes – Until They Saw The Results.

When Vistacion Valley Middle School in San Francisco decided to implement meditation into the curriculum back in 2007, more than a few teachers and parents rolled their eyes at the thought of this new age approach having any impact.

Meditation has been around for centuries, and numerous studies have shown its benefits, but until now we didn’t know what effect it would have in a classroom setting. The school in question had its share of troubled teens acting out, resulting in fights, low test scores, and other disciplinary problems.

Many thought it seemed like a waste of precious time. They were wrong.

“The kids see guns on a daily basis,” the school’s athletic director, Barry O’Driscoll said, adding, “there would be fights here three-to-five times a week.”

After a lot of discussion the school introduced “quiet time” where students put their heads on their desks and practiced transcendental meditation twice each day, for a 15 minute period of time. To counter the lost 30 minutes in each day, the school extended the day by the same amount of time, thus negating any complaints about lost teaching time.

Four years later they saw a 79% decrease in suspensions, a 98.3% increase in attendance, and a 400% increase in GPA. Those numbers proved quite substantial, and changed even the most skeptical teacher’s minds. Today Quiet Time is widely regarded as one of the most dramatically successful initiatives in the Bay Area, and perhaps best of all is that it requires zero resources – all you need is silence.

This sort of approach to mindfullness could easily benefit many children around the country, and with that in mind a new campaign was created to pursue integrating meditation into more classrooms.

Learn more about how you can help fund this promising initiative