She Transformed A School Bus Into An Artistic Ecovillage Dwelling

Once a perfectly ordinary yellow school bus, Aubergine is now an unusual tiny house in an unusual community, Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage in Missouri. Dancing Rabbit is a commune with a focus on ecological sustainability, so when their bus reached the end of its mobile life it was only natural to find a new use for it. In contrast to many bus conversions no attempt has been made to retain a bus aesthetic, and the bus itself has all but disappeared behind a sheet-metal roof, earthen berm and adjacent greenhouse.

Here’s Aubergine, getting towed into her final resting place…

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There are good practical reasons for all of the add-ons. The roof diverts rainwater to a collection system, the berm protects the bus body from the wind, and the heat from the greenhouse radiates so well to the living area that the woodstove inside is only needed at night.

Rainwater from the roof fills the blue plastic barrels, and the simple sun porch looks like a great place to read a book.

Aubergine 1Aside from heat, the greenhouse provides kale, horseradish, and strawberries.

Aubergine 6With the greenhouse on one side and an earthen berm on the other, Aubergine stays in the high 60s even when covered with snow.

Aubergine 5The drawback is that the interior’s rather dark, but colored glass bottles serving as small windows brighten it a bit.

Aubergine 4Katherine’s workspace – and coworker looking less than enthusiastic about the photo op.

Aubergine 3There’s no bathroom, but plenty of space for working, relaxing, and sleeping.

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Dancing Rabbit residents built Aubergine over several years at a cost of about $6,000, and it’s now home to eco-artist Katherine Hanson, who’s even found room for a small studio workspace inside the 150-square-foot bus frame. If you’d like to learn more, check out the Dancing Rabbit Ecovillage website.

Burt’s Bees Co-Founder Lives In A Tiny House

Have you ever wondered who the “Burt” behind the famous natural products company Burt’s Bees was? Perhaps you have, but you probably don’t know much about the reclusive man, and for the most part that’s the way he likes it.

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Burt’s Bees co-founder Burt Shavitz may have missed the big payout for the company, but he did get a pretty nice tiny house out of it. He’s still living in it and doesn’t seem inclined to leave – even for a little while.

“A good day is when no one shows up. And you don’t have to go anywhere,” says the famously reclusive beekeeper.”

If you’d like to spend a little time with him anyway, there’s a new documentary about his life, Burt’s Buzz, available for rent on Amazon; you can also watch the trailer there or check it out below.

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Watch the video below to learn more about his life

Eccentric Rolling Home Is A Work Of Art

Well, this answers the question, “What would it look like if you built a house on top of Mater from Cars?” The man who gave us that answer is John, a self-described “nomad artist” who calls the customized 1949 Dodge truck home as he travels the country painting, making handcrafted jewelry, and applying tattoos.

He built it, and he’s still building it, both to incorporate mementos of his journey and to replace pieces that have finally worn out. The latter’s a fairly frequent necessity because he used 100% salvaged materials in the truck.

In fact, John says that “It will probably look completely different in a year.” At which point we suppose he’ll have to start calling it the Truck of Theseus.

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He Saw A Homeless Woman Sleeping In The Dirt. What He Did Will Change Her Life!

How many times have you passed a homeless person without thinking much about their situation? Chances are we all have at some point. Homelessness is a pervasive issue that doesn’t seem to have any easy solution, but one man made a perfect demonstration of how to make a difference.

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Smokie is a 60-year-old homeless woman who lives in Los Angeles, and spends most of her time on a patch of dirt near an apartment building. Elvis Summers lives in that apartment building, and the two became aquainted as Smokie would often ask him for bottles and cans that she could recycle.

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Then one day Elvis heard about Greg Kloehn, a kind spirit in Oakland who made a name for himself building small shelters for homeless out of scraps he found in the garbage. He used pallets, bed boards, washing machine doors, and whatever else he could find to build the little homes, barely larger than a dog house.

Elvis was inspired by Greg, and decided he would make a home for Smokie, which you see here. The LAPD has been good-natured about things, saying as long as she moved it every few days nobody could complain.

It took five days and about $500 for Elvis to build the home, and he documented the process in a video he shared on Youtube:

“I’d like to offer purpose to these people in need and hire them to build the houses with me. I’ve even set an appointment with LA’s Mayor Eric Garcetti to try and get his help,”

The story is a great example of how one person can make a difference in the world, and also a practical demonstration of how tiny homes can help solve a very real problem in the world. After he finished, Elvis decided to launch a project called Mythpla (my tiny house project LA) to fund more shelters, and plans to continue building tiny homes for people who need them.

You can visit this Gofundme page to contribute to the effort.